aldersprig: an egyptian sandcat looking out of a terra-cotta pipe (conlang)
Okay, so, because of reasons, I want to have an idiomatic "thank you" for Calenyen.

And, because thank you is such a loaded concept, I wanted it to mean, essentially, "good shot."

Like, the thing you say when your buddy just caught the enemy/the giant cat that was about to kill you with a well-aimed spear. It's a thanks for assistance, without acknowledging debt owed.

So we have "shot" in the sense of an aimed attack with a distance weapon: vettu

And then we have good, a modifier meaning skilled and accurate: -one (like the end of loan)

Vettutone, "good shot": "Thanks for the assist."
aldersprig: an egyptian sandcat looking out of a terra-cotta pipe (conlang)
Oh no, September is syntactical rules and I've already covered the easy bit, sentence order... wait, have I?

I covered Old Tongue's in JuLECTURary, but not Calenyen's.

Calenyen is Subject-Object-Verb, with most modifiers being tacked on to the end of words. Tense is added to the beginning of verbs (Goat-red food-low pasttense-Is-Loudly bleating-at).

Old Tongue Also normally adds modifiers after the subject of the modifier, a holdover from their system of diacritical marks in the original ideography.

I think Old Tongue does some funky things with tense, but I'm not sure what yet, or how. And I just learned about Anaphora and think Old Tongue uses this heavily.

Short post! But it doesn't take many words to say S-O-V, V-S-O. :-)
Read more... )
aldersprig: an egyptian sandcat looking out of a terra-cotta pipe (conlang)
I'm going through 365 Conlang thingies beyond #Lexember one month a day (or so) until I get bored.

Here is the Julectury ("Write a lecture, lesson or 140 letter pedagogical tweet each day explaining how your language works") which I wrote last week.
Read more... )
aldersprig: an egyptian sandcat looking out of a terra-cotta pipe (conlang)
I'm going through 365 Conlang thingies beyond #Lexember (which is missing October...) one month a day (or so) up to September.(?) I'm skipping DismayCourse, shhh.

So I'm in Juneme again... Document or add to your phonetic inventory a phoneme a day, or add a rule to your phonotactics a day, or a Sandhi rule a day

Calenyen Phonatactics:

There will never be two vowel sounds in a row.

When borrowing words from other languages, the Calenyena almost always put another consonant between two vowels: Reiassan becomes reisassan. (ray-uh-san, rey-suh-san). Generally, when doing so, they will repeat a previous or following consonant; Calenyen loves repetition.



Old Tongue Phoneme:

Eron, (e) as in shed

This sound is a minor glyph, one that is often written down on the text line. Its original meaning is remaining, left-behind, and it is often used to indicate those fae that did not leave for Ellehem in the great departure.



Morphambruary 1
Febmanteau 1
Polysemarch 1
DisMayCourse
Juneme 1
Julectury
Augovernust 1
Morphambruary 2
Febmanteau 2
Polysemarch/Juneme2
✒️
Augovernust 2
aldersprig: an egyptian sandcat looking out of a terra-cotta pipe (conlang)
I'm going through 365 Conlang thingies beyond #Lexember (which is missing October...) one month a day (or so) up to August. We're back around to Polysemarch...

...Today I get to go in circles!

The entry for the Thorne-Alder has this section on the Arran/West Coast name for the taxonomic definition:
The Alder belongs to the family of spear-leaf trees, adavijamin, where adavi is "spear-blade" and "jamin" is "leaf". In that family, they belong to the mainer sub-family, "mainer" meaning "grove" or "family group, tribe."

In typical calenyen fashion, the word mainer has been borrowed and mutilated into Calenyen - raimain.

(it is a common practice, when the letters in a loan word do not quite work for Calenyen, to move letters about or repeat letters. In this case, it likely started as "ramainer" and was shortened).

So... raimain is "grove".

And it has also come to mean those that stick together clannishly. A raimain is a clique, a tight-knit group that acts similarly.



Okay, I give up on trying to do another one of these for Old Tongue quite yet, and I want to hold off on doing something with DisMayCourse, so ON TO JUNE(me) it is.

(Sh), shenera, which can be down with the modifier -eleg (a curved shape like a sideways lower-case "c", down on the bottom of the writing to become savera, (s).

The glyph for shenera can also mean child, as the word does, and with the modifier, savera means bastard child.

Linguists theorize that the word savera came from the word savo, birth.



Morphambruary 1
Febmanteau 1
Polysemarch
DisMayCourse
Juneme
Julectury
Augovernust
Morphambruary 2
Febmanteau 2
✒️
aldersprig: an egyptian sandcat looking out of a terra-cotta pipe (conlang)
I'm going through 365 Conlang thingies beyond #Lexember (which is missing October...) one month a day up to August.

And now we're on to Febumantau for a second round...

and that means I can do another day! Yay!

If bikbaano is Song-Day, then the second day of the week comes from a deity we haven't visited yet.

Which means we get to see a new deity.

This one is an old deity, one of the early Ideztozhyuha gods, Oonetoonen, from the roots Oonet, The Mountain, and noonen, climb (or oonen, a sacred climb): Oonetoonen is the deity of climbing mountains, of escape, of necessary things that are hard and painful.

And Oonetoonen's day is the second day of the week, biknoonen




For Old Tongue I'm going to start with a compound word in English, bondroll -
okay, this one requires a bit of background.

If one is Kept (a magical type of submission), the praise from one's Keeper (they who Keep you), is heady, pleasurable.

If your Keeper wants, they can get their Kept essentially drunk on praise - roll them with the Keeper-Kept bond.... thus bond-roll.

And in another calque...

Bond is tish, a lock, a seal.
Roll ends up being Otef - ote means wooziness; -ef verbs the noun.

Bond-Roll, translated directly ends up tishotef

(and never mind that there was already a word for that concept in Old Tongue...)



Morphambruary 1
Febmanteau 1
Polysemarch 1
DisMayCourse
Juneme 1
Julectury
Augovernust
Morphambruary 2
✒️
Polysemarch 2/ Juneme 2
aldersprig: an egyptian sandcat looking out of a terra-cotta pipe (conlang)
We're back to Morphambuary for another two bound morphemes!

I've just started playing with bullet journaling, so today's going to be a Day Name for Calenyen.

From an earlier post, I have:
From the god/dess Alivetta/Alibetto comes alittao, the art of instrumental music in Bitrani; in Calenyena, this becomes Litvaano, music (as played), and Libbaano, music as sung.

This has led to things related to music and song ending up with the suffix -v/baano.

Foremost among them is the name of the first day of the week:
bikbaano, Song-Day.

bik- by the way, is a shortening of bikdie, day; bik is used in all situations where the day is modified (holiday, song-day, birthday)



For Old Tongue, I'm going to pick another of those add-ons that are often marked by a single diacritical mark. This one, noen, means "now", but only as attached to a verb: Stand Now, come now, destroy now.

Classically, it is marked by three lines \|/ to the top right of the ideogram it is modifying. In texts using letters instead of ideograms, noen is sometimes written out and sometimes marked at the end of the word, as if the word was an ideogram.



Morphambruary 1
Febmanteau 1
Polysemarch
DisMayCourse
Juneme
Julectury
Augovernust
✒️
Febmanteau 2
aldersprig: an egyptian sandcat looking out of a terra-cotta pipe (conlang)
I continue on my I-missed-Conlanging adventure. Today is Julectury: Write a lecture, lesson or 140 letter pedagogical tweet each day explaining how your language works.

What I’m trying to create here would be two laypeople’s introductions to the languages, because man would it be cool if I could get enough vocabulary that someone could speak either of these languages. I’ll start with one small section of each language:
Read more... )


Morphambruary
Febmanteau
Polysemarch
DisMayCourse
Juneme
✒️
Augovernust
✒️
Julectury 2
aldersprig: an egyptian sandcat looking out of a terra-cotta pipe (conlang)
I've discovered that I missed conlanging, and as I've missed many months of "365 Conlang thingies beyond #Lexember," I decided in the remains of August, I would cycle through the first 8 months twice of conlang-exercises twice.

We're up to June!

Juneme – Document or add to your phonetic inventory a phoneme a day, or add a rule to your phonotactics a day, or a Sandhi rule a day (but not all three, that would be absurd)

See? I'm learning things every day! I had to look up Sandhi rules and phonotactics... and I think I have to try Calenyen more out loud before I can realize and Sandhi rules.

Calenyen Phonatactics:
* Two consonants appearing in a row (ketbaa, Diedreddakak) are pronounced separately, and mark a syllable break between them (ket-baa, died-red-dak-kak)

* A single consonant between syllables can belong to both syllables (lanutez lan-nut-tez)

* a palatalized consonant on its own between two syllables (Pebyab) is pronounced at the end of the first syllable as non-palatalized and then as palatalized in the beginning of the second syllable (peb-byab)

Ketbaa - mother
Diedreddakak - button-maker
lanutez - goat-hair braid, a faker
Pebyab - tiny baby goat



Old Tongue Phoneme

Ofein, a letter making the sound "o" as in the word "oh" (this is either o or o̞ in IPA, I think)

The word ofein also expresses the concept exist and is pronounced oh fine.




Morphambruary
Febmanteau
Polysemarch
DisMayCourse
✒️
Julectury
✒️
Polysemarch 2/ Juneme 2
aldersprig: an egyptian sandcat looking out of a terra-cotta pipe (conlang)
Turns out I missed conlanging, and as I've missed many months of "365 Conlang thingies beyond #Lexember," I decided in the remains of August, I would cycle through the first 8 months twice of conlang-exercises twice.

And bog help me, it's Dis-May-course!:

Write a speech, novel, epic poem, folk tale, or chat log a day to fill out your examples of discourse. Or one of the above if you have a real job.

Okay, so I'm going to write a line. In English, there once was a man from Kalakaig...
Read more... )


Morphambruary
Febmanteau
Polysemarch
✒️
Juneme
aldersprig: an egyptian sandcat looking out of a terra-cotta pipe (conlang)
Turns out I missed conlanging, and as I've missed many months of "365 Conlang thingies beyond #Lexember," I decided in the remains of August, I would cycle through the first 8 months twice of conlang-exercises twice.

Today is Polysemarch – Add a new meaning a day to an existing word in March. This might be challenging for my Old Tongue vocabulary of 15-or-so words...
Read more... )



Morphambruary
Febmanteau
✒️
DisMaycourse
✒️
Polysemarch 2/ Juneme 2
aldersprig: an egyptian sandcat looking out of a terra-cotta pipe (conlang)
As I said yesterday, I decided I missed conlanging, and as I've missed many months of "365 Conlang thingies beyond #Lexember," I decided in the remains of August, I would cycle through the first 8 months twice of conlang-exercises twice.

Today is Febumantau – Create compound word a day for February. It specifically says it doesn't have to be a portmanteau, but I decided to try for the challenge, especially since...
Read more... )


If you are not already following Haikujaguar, I suggest you check out her post today - 581 Words: on Language as Intermediary.


Morphambruary
✒️
Polysemarch
✒️
Febmanteau 2
aldersprig: (LynBack)
 
  • This weekend was a weekend of “oh, well, maybe later?” We went a lot of places, but mostly achieved very little.  However, it RAINED!  Lots!  *dances around in the rain*
    (Also, we did a lot of shopping, but that’s not all that exciting).

    • I’ve been thinking that for Lexember — or possibly before — I’ll do two “translation” projects — a portion of an illuminated page in Old Tongue (the language of the Ellehemaei in Fae Apoc/Addergoole) and a poem in Calenyen (for Reiassan).

      Is there anything in particular you’d like to see “translated” for such projects?


  • We went to see Ghostbusters.  My “review”, such as it is, can be seen here (warning — non-positive): https://twitter.com/lynthornealder/status/764593963034669056

  • We got an Instant Pot! It’s an electric pressure cooker, rice cooker, slow cooker, etc, etc.  We made steel cut oats in it, and they turned out pretty awesome.  
    See the Kitchn’s article on the Instant Pot here — https://t.co/P35KyOxnNm

  • The Shannara TV series has very little to do with my memories of the books, but those memories are 30-some years old.  Also? So much eye candy, and much of it male!

  • If anyone has any more pictures of this guy, cosplaying as Emergency Costume Repair, I’d love to see them.  Great idea!

  • Shutsumon introduced me to #WebFictionChat, and they are having a monthly Serial Book Club.  Check it out: https://twitter.com/Chrys_Kelly_/status/763776957314129920

  • Random moment of awesome while looking into illuminated texts — https://t.co/AazDZfuX0m this dragon climbing his way out of the text.

  • There is still one 250-word slot open in “Leave a Comment, get a fic” over at Addergoole’s new site.

  • Annnnd the meta-conversation with Jaco from Lady Taisiya’s Fourth Husband is still going strong over here: http://aldersprig.dreamwidth.org/tag/meta-conversations

aldersprig: (BookGlasses)
I decided I missed conlanging, and I'd missed many months of "365 Conlang thingies beyond #Lexember," so I decided in the remains of August, I would cycle through the first 8 months twice.

Today, Morphambuary – Coin a bound morpheme a day in January.

Starting with Calenyena: Bekkut comes from two words no longer used on their own, beka, fish, and tukut, river. These words have been replaced with new words with similar meanings, but a bekkut is still a river-fish, and torkut, from Tora, grass, is still a river-grass.




In Addergoole/Fae Apoc's Old Tongue, there are a number of morphemes only used as modifiers of other words. In the old ideograph system, they are often modifying diacritics.

-eleg is one of those. It means base in the sense of baseborn: lower, less-worthy, illegitimate.

In the word shenera, child, this would become shener/eleg/a, for instance.



next: Febmanteau
✒️ ✒️ ✒️
Morphambruary 2
aldersprig: an egyptian sandcat looking out of a terra-cotta pipe (conlang)
I am almost done translating an opening sentence into Whispers Drop!

I write this sitting in the kitchen sink. —Dodie Smith, I Capture the Castle (1948)

Write this - (I am) sitting sink kitchen while in - I

Hunsharn din shimorn tishor [kitchen] chur-chi - [I]

All I have left is kitchen as a modifier and a personal pronoun!

so durd-, "used for" is probably right here, it's the sink used for kitchen.

Kitchen, kitchen.

Okay, "To cook" is tenda

He/she cooks (continuous) is tendothe-chi, in

tothechi, cooks-in, kitchen.

durdtothechi, for the kitchen

And Personal pronouns!

Fan, Feb, fif, fefi I, she, he, ungendered-person,

Hunsharn din shimorn tishor durdtothechi chur-chi - fan

Yay! I did it!
aldersprig: an egyptian sandcat looking out of a terra-cotta pipe (conlang)
I continue to work on translating a quote into Whispers Drop

I write this sitting in the kitchen sink. —Dodie Smith, I Capture the Castle (1948)

Write this - (I am) sitting sink kitchen while in - I


Here, I started with:

Hunsharn din, write this.

To Sit, shima

Present tense continuous, first person singular: -orn

Sink, noun, tishor

cha, chea, choe, chi: for, of, at, in.... chur, while (conjunction)

Hunsharn din shimorn tishor [kitchen] chur-chi - [I]

Almost there!
aldersprig: an egyptian sandcat looking out of a terra-cotta pipe (conlang)
The end goal of Languary is to translate into your conlang one of the sentences from this list. I couldn't decide, so I used Random.org and got:

I write this sitting in the kitchen sink. —Dodie Smith, I Capture the Castle (1948)

Verb Object (Object adjective) (adverb) Subject (subject adjective)

This will probably take more than one post, because I have to take it apart and put it back together again, and I have NONE of those words.

I write this [while] sitting in the kitchen sink.

Write this - sitting kitchen sink while in - I

To Write, Hunsha

First person present tense.
Present tense third person singular is -art
Present tense, surrounding: -artfea

Present tense, first person singular present: -arn

I write, Hunsharn

This, that, those din, dom, dush

Hunsharn din, I write this (more to come!)
aldersprig: an egyptian sandcat looking out of a terra-cotta pipe (conlang)
What will the reader do with the text?

(Do Text-with what reader?)

shufa, to do

Who, What, Where, When, Why:
Nen, nib, neath, nash, nom

Third person future tense: -alss

[cha, chea, choe, chi: for, of, at, in], chur, with

--Shufalls futheat sha - chur ssrussolss-

[personal profile] inventrix:Eat it.

Fifishart Futheat sha ssrussolss.

(the reader devours the book)
aldersprig: an egyptian sandcat looking out of a terra-cotta pipe (conlang)
haph-Tachie and haph-Fota1 were sixteen years old when the Place found the next pair of twins. They were already past their age of peak usefulness and had been training as acolytes in the Institution for almost a decade, but the arrival of a new set of twin infants meant -

Well, for Fota, it meant freedom. They could go out in the world now. They could explore, they could learn what life was like outside of the Place. Fota couldn't wait to leave.

Tachie, on the other hand, liked the safety of the place and the comfort of an acolyte's rituals. She wanted to know what the world outside was like - but she didn't want to leave the Place, not permanently.

"The Institution will always support you," the Head Reader of the Place reminded them. "You can do whatever you want with your life."

"But what I want is to be here," Tachie insisted. She felt guilty, going against her twin... but the freedom Fota might find outside, she thought she might find in a little bit of separation. The chosen twins were always together, waking and sleeping. And Fota had always been the stronger twin.


1. one-Left, one-Right.
aldersprig: an egyptian sandcat looking out of a terra-cotta pipe (conlang)
I've been lax in my worldbuilding with all this WORDbuilding.

Today I am going to go back to a couple words I made earlier,
Ssrussolss, reading-person, and Ssolfutheat, book person.

"A reader, ssrussolss, is one who discerns the ancient texts. A ssolfutheat is one who keeps the books, a librarian."

The librarian has found a text for the reader.
Has found - the reader for - text, Librarian


Librarians do this; they serve not only as keepers of rare texts (magical, historical, controversial, personal) but also seek them out, perusing the strange corners of the world where books lie.

The readers, in turn, delve deep into these texts, finding meanings from the predecessors, from the Channels, from untrained powers, and divining them for current use.

To find, mafeata
-olp is third person singular present perfect.

futheat is a book, Futheat sha is a text.

cha, chea, choe, chi: for, of, at, in

Mafeatolp - ssrussolss cha - futheat sha, ssolfutheat.

And what will the reader do with that text?
aldersprig: an egyptian sandcat looking out of a terra-cotta pipe (conlang)
I continue to pull sentences from here: https://web.archive.org/web/20130307020009/http://fiziwig.com/conlang/syntax_tests.html
The rain came down.
(came down rain)
The kitten is playing in the rain.
(playing rain-in kitten)
The rain has stopped.
(stopped rain).



fetha, verb, to rain
fetham, noun, rain
felashef, noun, kitten (youth-cat)

dithasha, verb, to descend
hetheta, verb, to play
thea, in
ithtutha, verb, to stopped

Past tense, third person singular is still -iln

The rain came down, Dithashiln fetham

Present tense third person singular is -art

The kitten is playing in the rain, Hethetart fetham-thea felashef

-olp is third person singular present perfect.

The rain has stopped, Ithtutholp fetham.
aldersprig: (Lyn Calenyena Rin)
I continue to pull sentences from here: https://web.archive.org/web/20130307020009/http://fiziwig.com/conlang/syntax_tests.html

It's raining.
(is raining it)

The rain came down.
(came down raining)
The kitten is playing in the rain.
(playing in rain kitten)
The rain has stopped.
(stopped rain). (these 3 later)


fetha, verb, to rain
-am, turning a verb into a noun
fetham, noun, rain

THIS is the interesting part, because both the English and the French for "it rains" use a general pronoun. Il pleut, It/he present-tense-rain
Spanish skips the pronoun, as they often do:
está lloviendo Formal second-person singular to be, present-tense-rain

BUT I think there should be a word indicating the environment is doing something. SO.
fut, here-now place ("it")

Edited to add: Syntactic Expletive and Impersonal verbs seem to cover this phenomenon.

Present tense third person singular is -art


Present tense, surrounding:
-artfea

It's raining, Fethartfea fut.
aldersprig: an egyptian sandcat looking out of a terra-cotta pipe (conlang)
More from https://web.archive.org/web/20130307020009/http://fiziwig.com/conlang/syntax_tests.html

The kitten jumped up.
(Jumped up kitten)
The kitten jumped onto the table.
(Jumped table onto kitten)
My little kitten walked away.
(Walked away kitten-little my)

Verb Object (Object adjective) (adverb) Subject (subject adjective)


Kitten, jumped, table, walked. And Up!

So a kitten is a shefeen, a small cat, or a felashef, a youth-cat.

to Jump: phanfisha

Past tense, third person singular is still -iln, phanfishiln

Table table table. Table is palan

Up is fot

Phanfishiln fot felashef.

Onto, oh Lord... /runs away/ /comes back/

Over, onto, under, shab, shem, shosh

Phanfishiln palan shem felashef.

Towards, away, thim, threm

crap, forgot WALK.

Walk is ssetsse

and my -ro

Ssetsselin* threm felashefeen-ro.


Ssetsselin* threm Lyn.


* because it's irregular :-)
aldersprig: an egyptian sandcat looking out of a terra-cotta pipe (conlang)
Starting with this thing: https://web.archive.org/web/20130307020009/http://fiziwig.com/conlang/syntax_tests.html

All the people shouted.
Some of the people shouted.
Many of the people shouted twice.

First! People. People is the plural of person!

A Person is a difuf.

All of the people are difufore.

Shout!

Shout is Fassa.

Past tense, third person singular is -iln

But the people are plural!

Okay, then -ilnot.

Fassilnot

VOS, Fassilnot difufore., All of the people shouted.

Or Fassilnot difufara, some of the people shouted.

Many! Many is another word.

dathfuth

And so is twice! Oh lord, numbers.
haph, hash, hat, 1, 2, 3, haphad, hashad, hatad, once, twice, three times.

Fassilnot hashad difufara dathfuth, many of the people shouted twice (Shouted twice people many)
aldersprig: an egyptian sandcat looking out of a terra-cotta pipe (conlang)
Continuing from here...

Love is the irresistible desire...

Phothe [desire] [resist]udfeal [Love]

...to be irresistibly desired.


-elt, to be [verbed]

-ad, "-ly"

[desire]elt [resist]udfealad

Okay, now I get to see if I can do this.

Verb Object (Object adjective) (adverb) Subject (subject adjective)

[is] [desire irresistible desired irresistibly] [love]

Phothe [desire] [resist]udfeal [desire]elt [resist]udfealad [Love]

Okay, there's only three words there.

Love.

Feph

desire, noncha

resist, totfa

....I need to noun a verb.

-am

Phothe noncham totfudfeal nonchelt totfudfealad Feph
aldersprig: an egyptian sandcat looking out of a terra-cotta pipe (conlang)
I'm going to do [personal profile] inventrix's idea of translating a quote.

I went to http://www.brainyquote.com/quotes_of_the_day.html and got:

Love is an irresistible desire to be irresistibly desired.

oh, lord.

Okay, first half of this:

Love is an irresistible desire
[Love] [to be, conjugated] (article) [resist][-able]feal [desire]

* Question: Do I have articles?
after a quick bit of study, I think no.

* to be, pfa

-othe is the ending for:

Continuous present tense, third person singular.


[Love] phothe...

* -able?
-ud, dud-

[Love] phothe [resist]udfeal [desire].

Woo! *falls over*

Edit! Sentence order ack
Verb Object (Object adjective) (adverb) Subject (subject adjective)

Phothe [desire] [resist]udfeal [Love]

Phew!
aldersprig: an egyptian sandcat looking out of a terra-cotta pipe (conlang)
Okay, today I think we wrap up the Derivational Morphology.

What I have left on Zompist's list is:

augmentative, firf-, in rare cases, -irf
inhabitant, rur-
negative, -eal, lea-

sseabshub, dog, noun
a big dog, firsseabshub.
an undog, leasseabshub

hetfa, to do
to undo, hetfeal

Mrotnisha, to study, mrotnishal, studious
supremely studious, mrotnishalief
unstudious, mrotnishaleal

American person, Rurmerica
French Person, Rurfrance
aldersprig: an egyptian sandcat looking out of a terra-cotta pipe (conlang)
Some more Derivational Morphology for today!

causative & diminutive

Noun today is Fire, phan and verb is shout, teafa

Causative, -alt, talt-

to enfire, taltphana (because we're verbing a noun it gets an -a at the end)

to make-shout, teafalta (and the A moves to the end here.)

And diminutive, which is an irregular affix in that it always goes at the end!!

-een, or if very small, eeneen

A starting fire, tiny fire, a spark, phaneen

Shouting just a little, or a cute shout, teafeena

Little Phluf the scholar, Phlufeen.
aldersprig: an egyptian sandcat looking out of a terra-cotta pipe (conlang)
And yet more Derivational morphology!

Okay, so, I started off with the state of being, turning a noun or a verb into a noun.

and then I did noun-people and verb-people.

Today's nouns are pheassat, word, and dotfit, map

collection

dird-

Dirdphessat, a word-collection, a lexicon.

Dirdotfit, a map-collection, an atlas

(Fotafa, to run, fotafird, a planned series of runs)




Even more Derivational morphology!

Next up: tools and characteristic adjectives.

Our verb for this bit is deassa, to cut, and our noun is Toshtod, bread.

-urd, "used for"

deassurd, a cutting-thing.

durtoshtod, a bread-plate

-al, "like," "characteristic of"

deassal, cut-like (this would be, say "it cuts like a knife," sharp pain, often metaphoric.

laltoshtod, breadlike.
aldersprig: an egyptian sandcat looking out of a terra-cotta pipe (conlang)
Today is more Derivational morphology!

Okay, so, I started off with the state of being, turning a noun or a verb into a noun.

For today's part, we're going to go with the noun book, futheat and read, ssru (an irregular verb)

Associated Person
a book-person! Actually, first, a reading person, a reader:

Ssrussolss

When adding a suffix to a word ending in a vowel, repeat the ending consonant at the beginning of the suffix.

and then a book-person:
Ssolfutheat

When moving a -VLC suffix to prefix, repeat the ending C in the beginning. If it is prefixing (a rule here that includes sh and other awkward sounds), remove the ending C in the prefix.


In this case, a reader, ssrussolss, is one who discerns the ancient texts. A ssolfutheat is one who keeps the books, a librarian.
aldersprig: an egyptian sandcat looking out of a terra-cotta pipe (conlang)
Turning things into other things!

(Derivational morphology)

because Whispers Drop started out with a very small vocabulary (for plot-based reasons), it is very heavy on suffixes and prefixes to derive more meaning from one word.

For examples:

shef is cat
fena is to slink

"process or state" -orf
That would, technically, be "slinkage" or "the process of slinking across the hall, WHY did I pick slink?

fenorf, slinkage.

And, ah, cattiness, the state of being cat (because this is a noun, it is a prefix) For(f)shef, forshef

When moving a -VLC suffix to prefix, repeat the ending C in the beginning. If it is prefixing (a rule here that includes sh and other awkward sounds), remove the ending C in the prefix.

And there, we have one derivational morphology!

I can get /days/ out of this.

Which is good, because I'm way behind.
aldersprig: an egyptian sandcat looking out of a terra-cotta pipe (conlang)
Okay!

Now I have to Drop the Drop!

Which means I had to figure out that "present continuous" tense existed.

I have nuba, which is the root for drop.

Without figuring out all of the conjugations at the moment, -othe is the ending for:

Continuous present tense, third person singular.

But the whispers are plural!

Okay, then -othed.

the -a on nuba goes away, and you get Nubothed \ˈnəb ō ˌthed\

We're going VOS so:

nubothed ssussusser

Whispers Drop

Edit: I said VOS, I thought VOS, and then I wrote it SV. Sign. Fixed.
aldersprig: an egyptian sandcat looking out of a terra-cotta pipe (conlang)
If you're following this, you may have noticed that I'm fascinated by plurals with grammatical number.

So in making a plural to make the words Whispers Drop, I decided to make several plural forms.

-er is the most commonly used, and indicates a generic plural.

-ara indicates part of a group, "those four students," for instance.

-ore indicates all of a particular thing.

And here's another thing to add in!

Whisper is ssussu.

To make this plural, we'll repeat the first consonant (in this case the only consonant): ssussusser.

(Rule, courtest [personal profile] thnidu: "When pluralizing, if the word ends in a vowel copy the first consonant onto the end before adding the ending.")
aldersprig: an egyptian sandcat looking out of a terra-cotta pipe (conlang)
Okay, I want to name the language:

Whispers Drop

But this means I need to make:

1. Verb conjugation

2. pluralization

3. the words for whisper and drop

Okay, starting out easy:

ssussu, the first word in my gibberish, is Whisper.

nuba is going to be some form of drop

Okay, got that done. I'll do the next part tomorrow!

runs off
aldersprig: an egyptian sandcat looking out of a terra-cotta pipe (conlang)
Questions from Zompist's Language Construction Kit

This is a work in progress and also a learning exercise. I don't have all - even most of - the vocabulary, so pls. be patient.

Also, it's a worldbuilding exercise at the same time...


Is your language fusional, agglutinative, or isolating?

I think I'm going to go with fusional, in part to try something utterly different from Caleyen. It also gives me the option of moving one of the dialects to analytic or agglgglgluglug... *cough* Agglutinative.

How do you form inflections?

...Not sure yet!

I'm /thinking/ prefixes. It suits the way the sentences feel to me. But on the other hand, I'm fonder of suffixes for comprehension. That could be because English is my first language and I've only studied romance languages....

After a bit of research: Suffixes it is! Mostly.

Side note: Negation appears at the sentence's beginning or end, depending on context. That really goes in the Sentence order post.
aldersprig: an egyptian sandcat looking out of a terra-cotta pipe (conlang)
yay!
Okay, this is probably how I will write these in the Roman alphabet.

Consonants:
b, t, d, ph (ɸ), f, th, ss*, sh, h, pf, ch(/x/), [still-not-sure-I-have-a-J], r, l, m, n

* I could totally do this as "s" but I like the visual susurration of the double s.
** This is a very fricative language. I felt like it.

That was easy.

Vowels
uhu
oe(oo)o
ah(ae)a
ehe
eeea
ihi


Alphabet.... I'm still considering style, much less actual letters. And numbers. Since it's a real-world system, they may use arabic numbers.
aldersprig: an egyptian sandcat looking out of a terra-cotta pipe (conlang)
Sentence order for Whispers is
Verb Object (Object adjective) (adverb) Subject (subject adjective)
subject is the portion most likely to be dropped, as in Spanish, if it is clear from verb conjugation.

This appears to be the order - or close to it - that I like for magic-using languages.

Which leads to a note - unlike Old Tongue (The magic language in Fae Apoc/Addergoole), Whispers is not a Magic Language in and of itself. One CAN do magic in other languages (and some groups not mentioned here yet do). It's just that the Institution and its subgroups primarily use Whispers in their often-highly-ceremonial magical practices.
aldersprig: an egyptian sandcat looking out of a terra-cotta pipe (Default)
Conlang didn't get picked in yesterday's rotation, so I'll start with yesterday's post today: phonetics and feet.

Note: Everything in Language of Whispers is subject to lots and lots of change, as it's a work in progress. For instance, I've already added two more consonants.

I've been playing with zompists's generators. What I've decided is that the Language of Whispers is, ah...

(C(L))V(C)

With CV being the most common syllable construction.

Certain consonants do not start a word - r, l, ch.

I'm still working out consonants that just don't go together; I'm sure there's actually a rule there. jl in that order, pd, tp, ssr.

English leans towards iambic foot (In very rough generalizations, no need to pedant on this one ;-); Whispers leans towards trochee and dactyl feet.


The origins of the Language of Whispers are lost in the deep, dark annals of history. There are those, especially in the secretive reaches of the Institution, who believe that the language was first spoken to mankind by demons or by angels. Since most of the Institution doesn't believe in demons, this is considered more of a fanciful belief than a real one.

Over the centuries, the language has shifted - three separate dialects, various loan-words, and so on - and has suffered heavily from disuse at times. Only in small, hidden enclaves is it spoken as a casual language, and thus it often ends up using loan words for everyday items.
aldersprig: an egyptian sandcat looking out of a terra-cotta pipe (Default)
The Language of Whispers (Working Name) - Working Phoneme Set

The Language of Whispers has what we can call Liturgical Whispers, a working language used for texts and ceremonies, as well as at least three modern dialects: Heretical, Rebel, and Institutional, which include some phoneme shifts in each.

This may not be a complete list, as it only has 22 11 consonant sounds and 5 vowel sounds. But it's a start.

I based the set off of a gibberish language I've used from time to time.

ssuhssuh nuhbahr nuhchuh nihbah nuh sseedush...


labiallabiodentaldentalalveolaralv-palvelarglottal
stops(p)bt d(k)
fricativesf(v)θ ðss sh h
affricatespfch j
approximants  l
nasalsmn

Added a couple when I made it a table; they're in bold. Dialectical differences are in parentheses.

ss
n
m
ch/k
h
rr
sh
t
b/p
d
f/v

uh
oe/oo
ah/ae
eh
ee
ih
aldersprig: (Lyn Calenyena Rin)
[personal profile] anke asked for birds.

I already have kahger a hunting bird of prey and kyahg, a nuisance scavenger/carnivore bird

There are, of course, dozens and dozens of birds. But I'll pick out one for fun.

Tiez is a bird, in general - winged thing, feathers, lays eggs.

TiezLibbaa is a songbird.

And TiezLibbaa Ekondonkee-rul, Ekondonkee's songbird, often called the tiez-kon, is a bright blue songbird who nests in the northern reaches of the continent. They are known for springtime song, and a family of them nested in the tent of the warlord Ekondonkee, who has since been forgotten except in the name of the bird.

/'tēz lib 'bä 'e kōn 'dōn kē 'rəl/

Profile

aldersprig: an egyptian sandcat looking out of a terra-cotta pipe (Default)
aldersprig

Like It?

June 2017

S M T W T F S
     1 2 3
4 5 67 8 910
11 12 13 14 15 16 17
18 19 20 21 22 2324
25 2627282930 

Syndicate

RSS Atom

Most Popular Tags

Page Summary

Style Credit

Expand Cut Tags

No cut tags
Page generated Jun. 26th, 2017 10:29 pm
Powered by Dreamwidth Studios